International Journal of Genetics and Genomics

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Over View of Coffee (Arabica Coffee) Breeding in Ethiopia

Received: Dec. 12, 2023    Accepted: Dec. 29, 2023    Published: Feb. 05, 2024
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Abstract

Ethiopia, which is the origin and place of many varieties of Arabica coffee, is lucky in this regard. Although the genetic diversity of the coffee population provides a good opportunity for improvement, the lack of improved hybrids is a major problem. Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica L.) is the main coffee species in world coffee production, accounting for more than 60% of total production. 30% of Ethiopia's foreign exchange earnings come from Arabica coffee. Arabica coffee's unique aroma, taste and lack of caffeine make it a popular coffee variety in coffee producing and consuming countries. Since Ethiopia is the homeland of Arabica coffee, major genetic changes are expected in coffee genetic resources required for further development to meet the world's demand for Arabica coffee. The coffee plant is native to the Coffea and Rubiaceae genera. There are only two important and worldwide commercial species: Coffea arabica (Coffea arabica L.) and Coffea canephora Pierre. It is thought that the plant first appeared in Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica L.), whose genes are found in the southwestern region of Ethiopia. Greater genetic diversity of endogenous coffee varieties may lead to increased yield and reproductive characteristics. Therefore, the coffee program began in the 1970s, when coffee cherry virus (CBD) first appeared in Ethiopia. Breeding, selection and hybridization methods have been used since the beginning of breeding. Creating a simple understanding of Arabica coffee genetics and marketing 43 improved coffee varieties, including the 09 F1 hybrid, 6,793 entries were recorded and considered outstanding results. The article talks about specific achievements, challenges and hopes for the future.

DOI 10.11648/ijgg.20241201.12
Published in International Journal of Genetics and Genomics ( Volume 12, Issue 1, April 2024 )
Page(s) 8-12
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Coffee, Collection, Genetic Material, Hybridization, Hybrid, Selection

References
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  • APA Style

    Regassa, M. D. (2024). Over View of Coffee (Arabica Coffee) Breeding in Ethiopia. International Journal of Genetics and Genomics, 12(1), 8-12. https://doi.org/10.11648/ijgg.20241201.12

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    ACS Style

    Regassa, M. D. Over View of Coffee (Arabica Coffee) Breeding in Ethiopia. Int. J. Genet. Genomics 2024, 12(1), 8-12. doi: 10.11648/ijgg.20241201.12

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    AMA Style

    Regassa MD. Over View of Coffee (Arabica Coffee) Breeding in Ethiopia. Int J Genet Genomics. 2024;12(1):8-12. doi: 10.11648/ijgg.20241201.12

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  • @article{10.11648/ijgg.20241201.12,
      author = {Meseret Degefa Regassa},
      title = {Over View of Coffee (Arabica Coffee) Breeding in Ethiopia},
      journal = {International Journal of Genetics and Genomics},
      volume = {12},
      number = {1},
      pages = {8-12},
      doi = {10.11648/ijgg.20241201.12},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/ijgg.20241201.12},
      eprint = {https://download.sciencepg.com/pdf/10.11648.ijgg.20241201.12},
      abstract = {Ethiopia, which is the origin and place of many varieties of Arabica coffee, is lucky in this regard. Although the genetic diversity of the coffee population provides a good opportunity for improvement, the lack of improved hybrids is a major problem. Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica L.) is the main coffee species in world coffee production, accounting for more than 60% of total production. 30% of Ethiopia's foreign exchange earnings come from Arabica coffee. Arabica coffee's unique aroma, taste and lack of caffeine make it a popular coffee variety in coffee producing and consuming countries. Since Ethiopia is the homeland of Arabica coffee, major genetic changes are expected in coffee genetic resources required for further development to meet the world's demand for Arabica coffee. The coffee plant is native to the Coffea and Rubiaceae genera. There are only two important and worldwide commercial species: Coffea arabica (Coffea arabica L.) and Coffea canephora Pierre. It is thought that the plant first appeared in Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica L.), whose genes are found in the southwestern region of Ethiopia. Greater genetic diversity of endogenous coffee varieties may lead to increased yield and reproductive characteristics. Therefore, the coffee program began in the 1970s, when coffee cherry virus (CBD) first appeared in Ethiopia. Breeding, selection and hybridization methods have been used since the beginning of breeding. Creating a simple understanding of Arabica coffee genetics and marketing 43 improved coffee varieties, including the 09 F1 hybrid, 6,793 entries were recorded and considered outstanding results. The article talks about specific achievements, challenges and hopes for the future.
    },
     year = {2024}
    }
    

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    AB  - Ethiopia, which is the origin and place of many varieties of Arabica coffee, is lucky in this regard. Although the genetic diversity of the coffee population provides a good opportunity for improvement, the lack of improved hybrids is a major problem. Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica L.) is the main coffee species in world coffee production, accounting for more than 60% of total production. 30% of Ethiopia's foreign exchange earnings come from Arabica coffee. Arabica coffee's unique aroma, taste and lack of caffeine make it a popular coffee variety in coffee producing and consuming countries. Since Ethiopia is the homeland of Arabica coffee, major genetic changes are expected in coffee genetic resources required for further development to meet the world's demand for Arabica coffee. The coffee plant is native to the Coffea and Rubiaceae genera. There are only two important and worldwide commercial species: Coffea arabica (Coffea arabica L.) and Coffea canephora Pierre. It is thought that the plant first appeared in Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica L.), whose genes are found in the southwestern region of Ethiopia. Greater genetic diversity of endogenous coffee varieties may lead to increased yield and reproductive characteristics. Therefore, the coffee program began in the 1970s, when coffee cherry virus (CBD) first appeared in Ethiopia. Breeding, selection and hybridization methods have been used since the beginning of breeding. Creating a simple understanding of Arabica coffee genetics and marketing 43 improved coffee varieties, including the 09 F1 hybrid, 6,793 entries were recorded and considered outstanding results. The article talks about specific achievements, challenges and hopes for the future.
    
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Author Information
  • Crop (Breeding), Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Awada Agriculture Research Sub-Center, Yirgalem, Ethiopia

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