International Journal of Genetics and Genomics

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Impact of Anthropogenic Activities on Genetic Diversity of Celtis zenkeri Engl in South-West Nigeria

Received: 4 December 2020    Accepted: 22 December 2020    Published: 23 April 2021
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Abstract

Celtis zenkeri is a valuable tropical tree species for industrial and domestic purposes. For several years, exploitation of this species has not been sustainable and no reforestation or cultivation effort has been put in place both by governmental and non-governmental agencies. Anthropogenic activities have resulted in deforestation and subsequent reduction in the population size of important timber species. The research aim was to determine the impact of anthropogenic activities on genetic diversity of Celtis zenkeri in South-West Nigeria. Extensive sampling of Celtis zenkeri was carried out in four natural forest ecosystems. Two pristine forests (SNR, Akure forest and Osun Osogbo sacred grove) and two degraded forests (OA3 and Eda forest reserve). Young leaves were collected from each tree found in each site and preserved with silica gel for molecular analysis. In all, 130 accessions were sampled and were analyzed with five chloroplast microsatellite markers. In the result, allelic richness, which is a measure of genetic diversity and an indicator of a population's long-term potential for adaptability and persistence, was significantly higher in the two pristine forests than the two degraded forests. Statistically, a significant difference was not recorded for the observed heterozygosities (Ho) in the population of Celtis zenkeri in the pristine forests (Queen’s plot and Osun-Osogbo Sacred Grove) and a degraded forest (OA3). The formal indicates the possibility of conserving genetic diversity using traditional conservation approaches such as taboos and restrictions. Though OA3 is a degraded forest, the impact of the anthropogenic activities may not have been severe when compared with Eda forest reserve. At present, the scale of human activities in Eda forest reserve and OA3 could pose a serious threat to the future viability of the species if unchecked. Therefore, ex-situ conservation and sustainable harvesting of Celtis zenkeri are recommended.

DOI 10.11648/j.ijgg.20210902.11
Published in International Journal of Genetics and Genomics (Volume 9, Issue 2, June 2021)
Page(s) 31-35
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Genetic Diversity, Celtis zenkeri, Anthropogenic Activities, Sustainable Harvesting

References
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[3] Olajuyigbe S., and Adaja A. (2014). Floristic composition, tree canopy structure and regeneration in a degraded tropical humid rainforest in Southwest Nigeria. Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation. Vol. 84 (1) pp 1-23.
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    Fasalejo Olamidayo, Lawal Amadu, Adekunle Victor. (2021). Impact of Anthropogenic Activities on Genetic Diversity of Celtis zenkeri Engl in South-West Nigeria. International Journal of Genetics and Genomics, 9(2), 31-35. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijgg.20210902.11

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    ACS Style

    Fasalejo Olamidayo; Lawal Amadu; Adekunle Victor. Impact of Anthropogenic Activities on Genetic Diversity of Celtis zenkeri Engl in South-West Nigeria. Int. J. Genet. Genomics 2021, 9(2), 31-35. doi: 10.11648/j.ijgg.20210902.11

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    AMA Style

    Fasalejo Olamidayo, Lawal Amadu, Adekunle Victor. Impact of Anthropogenic Activities on Genetic Diversity of Celtis zenkeri Engl in South-West Nigeria. Int J Genet Genomics. 2021;9(2):31-35. doi: 10.11648/j.ijgg.20210902.11

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ijgg.20210902.11,
      author = {Fasalejo Olamidayo and Lawal Amadu and Adekunle Victor},
      title = {Impact of Anthropogenic Activities on Genetic Diversity of Celtis zenkeri Engl in South-West Nigeria},
      journal = {International Journal of Genetics and Genomics},
      volume = {9},
      number = {2},
      pages = {31-35},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ijgg.20210902.11},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijgg.20210902.11},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ijgg.20210902.11},
      abstract = {Celtis zenkeri is a valuable tropical tree species for industrial and domestic purposes. For several years, exploitation of this species has not been sustainable and no reforestation or cultivation effort has been put in place both by governmental and non-governmental agencies. Anthropogenic activities have resulted in deforestation and subsequent reduction in the population size of important timber species. The research aim was to determine the impact of anthropogenic activities on genetic diversity of Celtis zenkeri in South-West Nigeria. Extensive sampling of Celtis zenkeri was carried out in four natural forest ecosystems. Two pristine forests (SNR, Akure forest and Osun Osogbo sacred grove) and two degraded forests (OA3 and Eda forest reserve). Young leaves were collected from each tree found in each site and preserved with silica gel for molecular analysis. In all, 130 accessions were sampled and were analyzed with five chloroplast microsatellite markers. In the result, allelic richness, which is a measure of genetic diversity and an indicator of a population's long-term potential for adaptability and persistence, was significantly higher in the two pristine forests than the two degraded forests. Statistically, a significant difference was not recorded for the observed heterozygosities (Ho) in the population of Celtis zenkeri in the pristine forests (Queen’s plot and Osun-Osogbo Sacred Grove) and a degraded forest (OA3). The formal indicates the possibility of conserving genetic diversity using traditional conservation approaches such as taboos and restrictions. Though OA3 is a degraded forest, the impact of the anthropogenic activities may not have been severe when compared with Eda forest reserve. At present, the scale of human activities in Eda forest reserve and OA3 could pose a serious threat to the future viability of the species if unchecked. Therefore, ex-situ conservation and sustainable harvesting of Celtis zenkeri are recommended.},
     year = {2021}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Impact of Anthropogenic Activities on Genetic Diversity of Celtis zenkeri Engl in South-West Nigeria
    AU  - Fasalejo Olamidayo
    AU  - Lawal Amadu
    AU  - Adekunle Victor
    Y1  - 2021/04/23
    PY  - 2021
    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijgg.20210902.11
    DO  - 10.11648/j.ijgg.20210902.11
    T2  - International Journal of Genetics and Genomics
    JF  - International Journal of Genetics and Genomics
    JO  - International Journal of Genetics and Genomics
    SP  - 31
    EP  - 35
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2376-7359
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijgg.20210902.11
    AB  - Celtis zenkeri is a valuable tropical tree species for industrial and domestic purposes. For several years, exploitation of this species has not been sustainable and no reforestation or cultivation effort has been put in place both by governmental and non-governmental agencies. Anthropogenic activities have resulted in deforestation and subsequent reduction in the population size of important timber species. The research aim was to determine the impact of anthropogenic activities on genetic diversity of Celtis zenkeri in South-West Nigeria. Extensive sampling of Celtis zenkeri was carried out in four natural forest ecosystems. Two pristine forests (SNR, Akure forest and Osun Osogbo sacred grove) and two degraded forests (OA3 and Eda forest reserve). Young leaves were collected from each tree found in each site and preserved with silica gel for molecular analysis. In all, 130 accessions were sampled and were analyzed with five chloroplast microsatellite markers. In the result, allelic richness, which is a measure of genetic diversity and an indicator of a population's long-term potential for adaptability and persistence, was significantly higher in the two pristine forests than the two degraded forests. Statistically, a significant difference was not recorded for the observed heterozygosities (Ho) in the population of Celtis zenkeri in the pristine forests (Queen’s plot and Osun-Osogbo Sacred Grove) and a degraded forest (OA3). The formal indicates the possibility of conserving genetic diversity using traditional conservation approaches such as taboos and restrictions. Though OA3 is a degraded forest, the impact of the anthropogenic activities may not have been severe when compared with Eda forest reserve. At present, the scale of human activities in Eda forest reserve and OA3 could pose a serious threat to the future viability of the species if unchecked. Therefore, ex-situ conservation and sustainable harvesting of Celtis zenkeri are recommended.
    VL  - 9
    IS  - 2
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Forestry and Wood Technology, Federal University of Technology Akure, Akure, Nigeria

  • Forestry and Wood Technology, Federal University of Technology Akure, Akure, Nigeria

  • Forestry and Wood Technology, Federal University of Technology Akure, Akure, Nigeria

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